Sunday, June 30, 2013

GOD LIVES UNDER THE BED

I envy Kevin.   My brother,  Kevin,  thinks God lives under his bed.    At least that's what I heard him say one night. 


He was praying out loud in his dark bedroom, and I stopped to listen,  'Are you there, God?'  he said. 'Where are you?   Oh,  I see. Under  the bed...'
 


I giggled softly and tiptoed off to my own room Kevin's unique perspectives are often a source of amusement. But that night something else lingered long after the humor. I realized for the  first time the very different world Kevin lives in. 


He was born 30 years ago, mentally disabled as a result of difficulties during labor. Apart from his size (he's 6-foot-2), there are few  ways in which he is an adult.


He  reasons and communicates with the capabilities of a 7-year-old,  and he always will.  He will probably always believe that God lives  under his bed, that Santa Claus is  the one who fills the space under our tree every Christmas and that airplanes stay up in  the sky because angels carry them. 


I remember wondering if Kevin realizes he is different. Is he ever dissatisfied with his monotonous life?


Up before dawn each day,  off to work at a workshop for the disabled,  home to walk our cocker spaniel, return to eat his favorite  macaroni-and-cheese for dinner, and later to bed. 


The only variation in the entire scheme is laundry, when he hovers excitedly over the washing machine like a mother with her newborn child.


He does not seem dissatisfied.


He lopes out to the bus every morning at 7:05, eager for a day of simple work.
 

He wrings his hands excitedly while the water boils on the stove  before dinner, and he stays up late twice a week to gather our dirty laundry for his next day's laundry chores. 


And Saturdays - oh, the bliss of Saturdays! That's the day my Dad  takes Kevin to the airport to have a soft drink,  watch the planes land,  and speculate loudly on the destination of each passenger inside. 'That one's goin' to Chi-car-go! ' Kevin shouts as he claps his hands.


His anticipation is so great he can hardly sleep on Friday nights.


And so goes his world of daily rituals and weekend field trips.


He doesn't know what it means to be discontent.. 


His life is simple.


He will never know the entanglements of wealth or power, and he does  not care what brand of clothing he wears or what kind of food he  eats. His needs have always been met, and he never worries that one day they may not be.


His hands are diligent.  Kevin is never more happy than when he is working.  When he unloads the dishwasher or vacuums the carpet,  his heart is completely in it.


He does not shrink from a job when it is begun, and he does not leave  a job until it is finished. When his tasks are done,   Kevin knows how to relax.


He is not obsessed with his work or the work of others.  His heart is pure.


He still believes everyone tells the truth, promises must be kept, and when you are wrong, you apologize instead of argue. 
 

Free from pride and unconcerned with appearances, Kevin is not afraid to cry when he is hurt, angry or sorry. He is always transparent,  always sincere.

And he trusts God. 


Not confined by intellectual reasoning, when he comes to Christ, he comes as a child.  Kevin seems to know God - to really be friends with Him in a way that is difficult for an 'educated' person to grasp. God is his closest companion. 


In my moments of doubt and frustrations with Christianity,   I envy the security Kevin has in his simple faith.  
  

It is then that I am most willing to admit that he has some divine knowledge that rises above my mortal questions. 


It is then I realize that perhaps he is not the one with the handicap.  I am.  My obligations, my fear, my pride, my circumstances - they all  become disabilities when I do not trust them to God's care.


Who knows if Kevin comprehends things I can never learn?   After all,  he has spent his whole life in that kind of innocence, praying after dark and soaking up the goodness and love of God.


And one day,  when the mysteries of heaven are opened,  and we are all amazed at how close God really is to our hearts, I'll realize that God heard the simple prayers of a boy who believed that God lived under his bed.


Kevin won't be surprised at all!


When  you receive this, say a prayer.
That's all you have to do.
There  is nothing attached but God's blessings.
 
 

FRIENDS  ARE ANGELS WHO LIFT US TO OUR FEET WHEN OUR WINGS HAVE TROUBLE  REMEMBERING HOW TO FLY



Saturday, June 29, 2013

the NSA's enormous Utah spy-data warehouse

NSA is collecting millions of U.S. phone records along with digital communications on nine major Internet providers and is likely to store it in secret at an immense Utah facility, scheduled to open in October.


The mammoth center, which cost some $1.7 billion, will allow the agency to store more and, perhaps more importantly, keep information for much longer. It may hold up to a yottabyte of information, the largest measurement computer scientists have.  
A yottabyte is equal to 500 quintillion pages of text.


Beyond just backup tapes, the facility likely holds row upon row of server computers like these at Google's data center in The Dalles, Ore. Google uses these data centers to store email, photos, video, calendar entries and other information shared by its users.

An aerial view of the cooling units at the NSA's enormous Utah Data Center in Bluffdale


The long, squat buildings span 1.5 million square feet, and are filled with super-powered computers designed to store massive amounts of information gathered secretly from phone calls and emails.






Friday, June 28, 2013

How to run your own NSA spy program


The U.S. government takes a big data approach to intelligence gathering. And so can you!

Mike Elgan
 
June 22, 2013 (Computerworld)
Everybody's talking about PRISM, the U.S. government's electronic surveillance program.
We don't know all the details about PRISM (also called US-984XN). But we learned enough from abadly designed PowerPoint presentation leaked by NSA contractor Edward Snowden to feeloutraged by its reach and audacity.
In a nutshell, PRISM (and related telephone surveillance programs) take a big data approach to spying on foreign terrorists using American servers.
PRISM and related programs may harvest metadata of every phone call, every email, every Internet search, every Facebook post -- everything -- and use algorithmic filtering to find suspicious communication. Once they've found it, they can get a warrant to listen to the actual phone calls and read the actual email to find clues that enable authorities to stop terrorist attacks before they happen. (You know, Minority Report-style precrime.)
Metadata is not the content of the phone call or email, but the information about them: Who contacted whom, when, from where and for how long.
PRISM inspires shock and awe. But if you set aside the shock part -- the privacy and constitutional implications -- you realize the awe component is worth exploring.
The PRISM approach is this: Cast the widest possible information net, then use machine intelligence to serve up just the needles without the haystack.
PRISM works. It gets government snoops what they're looking for. And if it works for the NSA, it can work for you, too.
In fact, the ideas behind PRISM are built into a wide variety of tools available to everybody.
So here's how to run your own private PRISM program:

1. Capture massive amounts of data

One of the NSA's goals is to record the metadata on every phone call and email.
Obviously, no human personally reads all that data. But it's copied and stored anyway for searching later.
You can take the same approach. One easy way is to use integrated Google services together.
Google now offers 15 GB of free storage that can be divided any way you like between Gmail,Google Drive and Google+ photos. And they'll give you more if you pay for it.
Google also offers an Alerts service that searches the Internet and mails you the results. Most people set up only the number of Alerts that they can read. But that's not the NSA way.
The PRISM approach would be to harvest far more Google Alerts than any human could possible process, then use Gmail filters to automatically skip the inbox and send them straight to a specially created folder within Gmail. You can set up new Alerts every day each time you think of an area of interest. These can include people you know, companies to watch, ideas to keep up with.
Alerts won't send you the data (the story), but the metadata (information about the story, plus the link). One advantage of this approach is that if a site is deleted, making it vanish also from Google Search, you'll still have a record of it with enough metadata to pursue leads.
Note that Google also offers Google Scholar Alerts, which works like regular alerts but that searches academic books, papers and other resources. This is one of the great underappreciated services on the Internet.
You can also spy on yourself NSA style by capturing the metadata on your phone calls and chats. (Of course, the email is already there.)
The trick is to use Google Voice, and turn on the features that save your information to email. (Note that Voice will send your data to any email address, not just a Gmail one.) You'll find the appropriate checkboxes under the Voicemail & Text tab of Google Voice Settings.
This will send metadata on all of your calls, plus full data on all your SMS chats, transcripts of your recorded calls and voicemails and even the sound recording of your voicemails for searching later.
Note that Google's new Hangouts feature, which is accessible in Gmail, Google+ and in the dedicated Hangouts mobile apps, will send the full text of all your chats plus metadata on your video calls to the Gmail address associated with your Google+ account.
You can also use various tools like IFTTT or Zapier to automatically drop all content or metadata from any RSS feed into Google Drive, or alternatives like Evernote for searching later on.
Remember: Do it the NSA way and go nuts with this, dropping dozens, or even hundreds of items per day into your searchable storage. Don't worry about having too much data. Have faith in existing and future search tools to later find what you're looking for.
Beyond the automated harvesting of data, don't forget the manual approach, either. Capture every document that might someday be relevant and dump it into a special folder in Google Drive by using a browser extension like the Save to Google Drive plug-in. (Chrome has other extensions and so do other browsers.) You can do similar one-click saving using Evernote Web Clipper.
Once all this data and metadata is pouring into Gmail and Drive, you can simply use Google's search features to find what you're looking for.
The key to great NSA-style data harvesting, by the way, is to constantly tweak your code. Keep adding, deleting and modifying your Google Alerts and RSS feeds to make sure they deliver the kind of data you want.

2. Use algorithmic filtering

Algorithmic "noise filters" are popping up everywhere these days, especially on social networks and social media services where users could be overwhelmed by too much information.
But thinking like the NSA, we can use these filters to cast a massively wide information net, then let the filters weed out duplicate and irrelevant information for us. (Note that I got this tip from a conversation with blogger Robert Scoble this week.)
The idea is to set up a special-purpose Twitter feed for information harvesting, then use it to follow vastly more content sources than any human could possibly keep up with.
Then, read that feed using Flipboard, Prismatic or some other site that filters content for you and that supports Twitter. (Note that these services also support Facebook and Google Reader, but Google will discontinue Reader soon. Twitter is probably your best bet.)
One thing these filters do well is eliminate content duplicates. Instead of getting 500 stories about the name of Kanye and Kim's baby, you'll get just one story -- probably the best or most popular one -- and get it over with.
Another way to think about the power of algorithmic de-duping is that normally you might not follow a news source from which only one story in 100 is unique or exclusive. But because duplicate stories are filtered out, you get only the one unique story from that source and not the 99 also-ran stories.
This elimination of duplicates frees you to follow news and content sources promiscuously, casting an ultra-wide net without fear of overloading yourself with redundant content.

3. Don't forget the new photograph recognition tech

One of the amazing spy tools at the disposal of the NSA is the ability to process photographs for face, object and location information.
These tools are at your disposal, too.
Facebook's new Graph Search feature lets you quickly experiment with finding photos by trying different queries. For example, if you search for "Pictures taken by people who work at ..." followed by a company, you'll get what you asked for. (This is one way to spy on a competitor, for example.)
Google's picture searching takes it even further, enabling you to search not only for tags, keywords, associated text and location, but also content categorization. Google can actually recognize objects, landmarks and other stuff, even if the person who posted it added no such context.
For example, if you search Google+ for something like Sydney Opera House, you'll get a massive trove of pictures of the building, many of which are not accompanied by any mention of the words Sydney, Opera or House. Google actually recognizes the building using machine intelligence.
The same goes for categories of things. You can search for the word "car," which is not a specific thing but a type or category of thing. Google still gives you cars, whether they're tagged or not.
There's one ironic caveat to using the NSA's methods for wide-scale information harvesting and algorithmic filtering, which is that the NSA may theoretically know everything you're doing.
The NSA's domestic surveillance programs are controversial and possibly unconstitutional. But let's face it: They work.

And the NSA's methods can work for you, too....


Tuesday, June 25, 2013

My new doctor!

I recently picked a new primary care doctor. 

After two visits and exhaustive Lab tests, she said I was doing fairly well for my age.   (I am past Sixty Five).


A little concerned about that comment, I couldn't resist asking her, 'Do you think I'll live to be 80?'


She asked, 'Do you smoke tobacco, or drink beer, wine or hard liquor?'


'Oh no,' I replied. 'I'm not doing drugs, either!'


Then she asked, 'Do you eat rib-eye steaks and barbecued ribs?'


'I said, 'Not much.  My former doctor said that all red meat is very unhealthy!'


'Do you spend a lot of time in the sun, like playing golf, boating, sailing, hiking, or bicycling?'


'No, I don't,' I said.


She asked, 

'Do you gamble, drive fast cars, or have a lot of sex?'


'No,' I said.


She looked at me and said, 


'Then, why do you even give a darn?'




and speaking of doctor's,
here is an old classic with Archie and his "condition"..




Monday, June 24, 2013

Children Writing About The Ocean:

The next time you take an oceanography course, 
you will be totally prepared.



1) - This is a picture of an octopus. It has eight testicles. (Kelly, age 6)


2 ) - Oysters' balls are called pearls. 

      (Jerry, age 6)


3) - If you are surrounded by ocean, you are an island. If you don't have ocean all round you, you are incontinent. 

(Mike, age 7)


4) - Sharks are ugly and mean, and have big teeth, just like Emily Richardson . She's not my friend any more. (Kylie, age 6)


5) - A dolphin breaths through a hole on the top of its head. (Billy, age 8)


6) - My uncle goes out in his boat with 2 other men and a woman and pots and comes back with crabs. 

(Millie, age 6)


7) - When ships had sails, they used to use the trade winds to cross the ocean. Sometimes when the wind didn't blow the sailors would whistle to make the wind come. My brother said they would have been better off eating beans. (William, age 7)


8) - Mermaids live in the ocean. I like mermaids. They are beautiful and I like their shiny tails, but how on earth do mermaids get pregnant? Like, really? (Helen, age 6)


9) - I'm not going to write about the ocean. My baby brother is always crying, my Dad keeps yelling at my Mom, and my big sister has just got pregnant, so I can't think what to write. (Amy, age 6)


10) - Some fish are dangerous. Jellyfish can sting. Electric eels can give you a shock. They have to live in caves under the sea where I think they have to plug themselves in to chargers. 

(Christopher, age 7)


11) - When you go swimming in the ocean, it is very cold, and it makes my willy small. (Kevin, age 6)


12) - Divers have to be safe when they go under the water. Divers can't go down alone, so they have to go down on each other.(Becky, age 8)


13) - On vacation my Mom went water skiing. She fell off when she was going very fast. She says she won't do it again because water fired right up her big butt. (Julie, age 7)


14) - The ocean is made up of water and fish. Why the fish don't drown I don't know. (Bobby, age 6)


15) - My dad was a sailor on the ocean. He knows all about the ocean. What he doesn't know is why he quit being a sailor and married my mom. 

(James, age 7)



Sunday, June 23, 2013

The Monk Story

A man is driving down the road and breaks down near a monastery. He goes to the monastery, knocks on the door, and says, "My car broke down. Do you think I could stay the night?"




The monks graciously accept him, feed him dinner, and even fix his car. As the man tries to fall asleep, he hears a strange sound; a sound like no other that he has ever heard.The next morning, he asks the monks what the sound was, but they say, We can't tell you because you're not a monk.




The man is disappointed but thanks them anyway and goes about his merry way. Some years later, the same man breaks down in front of the same monastery.




The monks again accept him,
feed him, and even fix his car.





That night, he hears the same strange mesmerizing sound that he had heard years earlier.





The next morning, he asks what the sound was, but the monks reply, "We can't tell you because you're not a monk."




The man says, "All right, all right. I'm dying to know. If the only way I can find out what that sound was is to become a monk. How do I  become a monk?"




The monks reply, "You must travel the earth and tell us how many blades of grass there are and the exact number of sand pebbles. When you find these numbers, you will become a monk."




The man sets about his task. Some forty-five years later, he returns and knocks on the door of the monastery. He says, "I have travelled the earth and devoted my life to the task demanded and have found what you had asked for. There are 371,145,236,284,232 blades of grass and 231,281,219,999,129,382 sand pebbles on the earth."





The monks reply, "Congratulations, you are correct, and you are now considered a monk. We shall now show you the way to the sound."





The monks lead the man to a wooden door, where the head monk says, the sound is behind that door.





The man reach for the knob, but the door is locked. He asks, "May I have the key?"




The monks give him the key, and he opens the door.




Behind that wooden door is another door made of stone.
The man requests the key to the stone door.






The monks give him the key, and he opens it, only to find a third door made of ruby. He demands another key from the monks, who provide it. Behind that door is another door, this one made of sapphire. And so it went on until the man had gone through doors of emerald, silver, topaz, and amethyst.







Finally, the monks say,
"This is the key to the last door."







The man is relieved to be at the end. He unlocks the door, turns the knob, and behind that door  he is astonished to find the source of that strange sound. It is truly an amazing and unbelievable sight.























 








... But I can't tell you what it is because you're not a monk.





 


DON'T SWEAR AT ME; 

I'M STILL HUNTING FOR THE IDIOT WHO STARTED THIS !


but I bet you send it on!


Saturday, June 22, 2013

Remember driving the bumper cars at amusement parks ?

                                  Where Do Old Bumper Cars Go?
The ones in Coney Island and Rockaway Park back in the 20s thru to the 50's ran on electric.  Had a pole on the back going to a metal electrical charged overhead plate
.


These little "beasties" are street legal.











 They run on either Kawasaki or Honda motorcycle engines and co-opt vintage bumper car bodies into the most awesome form of mini-car we've seen in too long. There are seven of these little monsters floating around California and they're all the creation of one man, Tom Wright, a builder in the outskirts of San Diego who figured the leftovers of the Long Beach Pike amusement park needed a more dignified end than the trash heap.


They were originally powered by two cylinder Harley Davidson Motorcycle engines but they rattled like heck because of the two cylinder Vibration and Tom replaces them with four cylinder Honda or Kawasaki 750's and a couple have been measured as capable of 160 MPH, which is terrifyingly fast in machines with such a short wheelbase.


By the way, they are almost indestructible in accidents!





Wednesday, June 19, 2013

The winter of my life

You know. . . Time has a way of moving quickly and catching you unaware of the passing years. It seems just yesterday that I was young, just married and embarking on my new life with my mate. Yet in a way, it seems like eons ago, and I wonder where all the years went. I know that I lived them all. I have glimpses of how it was back then and of all my hopes and dreams.


But, here it is... The winter of my life and it catches me by surprise... How did I get here so fast? Where did the years go and where did my youth go? I remember well seeing older people through the years and thinking that those older people were years away from me and that winter was so far off that I could not fathom it or imagine fully what it would be like.


But, here it is... My friends are retired and getting grey... They move slower and I see an older person now. Some are in better and some worse shape than me... But, I see the great change... Not like the ones that I remember who were young and vibrant... But, like me, their age is beginning to show and we are now those older folks that we used to see and never thought we'd be. Each day now, I find that just getting a shower is a real target for the day! And taking a nap is not a treat anymore... it's mandatory! Cause if I don't on my own free will... I just fall asleep where I sit!


And so... Now I enter into this new season of my life unprepared for all the aches and pains and the loss of strength and ability to go and do things that I wish I had done but never did!! But, at least I know, that though the winter has come, and I'm not sure how long it will last... This I know, that when it's over on this earth... Its over. A new adventure will begin!


Yes, I have regrets. There are things I wish I hadn't done... Things I should have done, but indeed, there are many things I'm happy to have done. It's all in a lifetime.


So, if you're not in your winter yet... Let me remind you, that it will be here faster than you think. So, whatever you would like to accomplish in your life please do it quickly! Don't put things off too long!! Life goes by quickly. So, do what you can today, as you can never be sure whether this is your winter or not! You have no promise that you will see all the seasons of your life... So, live for today and say all the things that you want your loved ones to remember... And hope that they appreciate and love you for all the things that you have done for them in all the years past!!


"Life" is a gift to you. The way you live it is your gift to those who come after. Make it a fantastic one.


LIVE IT WELL! ENJOY TODAY! DO SOMETHING FUN! 

BE HAPPY ! HAVE A GREAT DAY


Remember: "It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.


LASTLY, CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING: 

TODAY IS THE OLDEST YOU'VE EVER BEEN, YET THE YOUNGEST YOU'LL EVER BE SO - ENJOY THIS DAY WHILE IT LASTS.


~Your kids are becoming you...... But your grandchildren are perfect!

~Going out is good.. Coming home is better!

~You forget names.... But it's OK because other people forgot they even knew you!!!

~You realize you're never going to be really good at anything.... Especially golf.

~The things you used to care to do, you no longer care to do, but you really do care that you don't care to do them anymore.

~You sleep better on a lounge chair with the TV blaring than in bed. It's called "pre-sleep".

~You miss the days when everything worked with just an "ON" and "OFF" switch..

~You tend to use more 4 letter words ... "what?"..."when?"... ???

~Now that you can afford expensive jewelry, it's not safe to wear it anywhere.

~You notice everything they sell in stores is "sleeveless"?!!!

~What used to be freckles are now liver spots.

~Everybody whispers.

~You have 3 sizes of clothes in your closet.... 2 of which you will never wear.

~But Old is good in some things: Old Songs, Old movies, and best of all, OLD FRIENDS!!

Stay well, "OLD FRIEND!" Send this on to other "Old Friends!" and let them laugh in AGREEMENT!!!

It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Over generations, artists have kept Superman in style. A look at the iconic Superman "S" through the years:





































































Man of Steel is a 2013 American superhero film directed by Zack Snyder, produced by Christopher Nolan, and scripted by David S. Goyer. It employs non-linear storytelling. Based on the DC Comics character Superman, the film is a reboot of the Superman film series that portrays the character's origin story. The film stars Henry Cavill in the title role with Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Michael Shannon as General Zod, Diane Lane as Martha Kent, Kevin Costner as Jonathan Kent, Laurence Fishburne as Perry White, and Russell Crowe as Jor-El. Man of Steel is intended to launch a shared fictional universe of DC Comics characters on film.[8]
Development began in 2008 when Warner Bros. Pictures took pitches from comic book writers, screenwriters and directors, opting to reboot the franchise. In 2009, a court ruling resulted in Jerry Siegel's family recapturing the rights to Superman's origins and Siegel's copyright. The decision stated that Warner Bros. did not owe the families additional royalties from previous films, but if they did not begin production on a Superman film by 2011, then the Shuster and Siegel estates would be able to sue for lost revenue on an unproduced film. Nolan pitched Goyer's idea after story discussion on The Dark Knight Rises, and Snyder was hired as the film's director in October 2010. Principal photography started in August 2011 in West Chicago, Illinois, before moving to Vancouver and Plano, Illinois.
Man of Steel's red carpet debut in the U.S. was attended by its principal cast members in New York City on June 10, 2013.[9] The film was released to the general public on June 14, 2013, in conventional, 3D[10] and IMAX theaters.[11]


wikipedia











Monday, June 17, 2013

HISTORY OF THE CAR RADIO

Seems like cars have always had radios, but they didn't. Here's the true story:


 One evening, in 1929, two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset. It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.


 Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear had served as a radio operator in the U.S. Navy during World War I) and it wasn't long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car. But it wasn't as easy as it sounds: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running. One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago. 



There they met Paul Galvin , owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. He made a product called a "battery eliminator" a device that allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current. But as more homes were wired for electricity more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios. Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it. He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business.


 Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin's factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker. Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker's Packard. Good idea, but it didn't work -- Half an hour after the installation, the banker's Packard caught on fire. (They didn't get the loan.) Galvin didn't give up. He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the 1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention.


 Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it. That idea worked -- He got enough orders to put the radio into production.


 WHAT'S IN A NAME

 That first production model was called the 5T71. Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier. In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix "ola" for their names - Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola were three of the biggest. Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it the Motorola. But even with the name change, the radio still had problems: When Motorola went on sale in 1930, it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650, and the country was sliding into the Great Depression. (By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)


 In 1930 it took two men several days to put in a car radio -- The dashboard had to be taken apart so that the receiver and a single speaker could be installed, and the ceiling had to be cut open to install the antenna. These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery, so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them. The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions.


 Selling complicated car radios that cost 20 percent of the price of a brand-new car wouldn't have been easy in the best of times, let alone during the Great Depression -- Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that. But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorola's pre-installed at the factory. In 1934 they got another boost when Galvin struck a deal with B.F. Goodrich tire company to sell and install them in its chain of tire stores. By then the price of the radio, installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running. (The name of the company would be officially changed from Galvin Manufacturing to "Motorola" in 1947.)


 In the meantime, Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios. In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning, it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts. In 1940 he developed with the first handheld two-way radio -- The Handie-Talkie -- for the U. S. Army.


 A lot of the communications technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II. In 1947 they came out with the first television to sell under $200. In 1956 the company introduced the world's first pager; in 1969 it supplied the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon. In 1973 it invented the world's first handheld cellular phone. Today Motorola is one of the largest cell phone manufacturer in the world -- And it all started with the car radio.


 WHATEVER HAPPENED TO
 The two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin's car, Elmer Wavering and William Lear, ended up taking very different paths in life. Wavering stayed with Motorola. In the 1950's he helped change the automobile experience again when he developed the first automotive alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and,eventually, air-conditioning.


 Lear also continued inventing. He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players? Lear invented that. But what he's really famous for are his contributions to the field of aviation. He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot, designed the first fully automatic aircraft landing system, and in 1963 introduced his most famous invention of all, the Lear Jet, the world's first mass-produced, affordable business jet. (Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade.)


 Sometimes it is fun to find out how some of the many things that we take for granted actually came into being! 


and it all started with a woman's suggestion!!! 

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Father's Day Gifts - or, Stuff Just For Guys


A gun is like a parachute, if you don't have it when you need it, you won't need it again.