Wednesday, April 30, 2014

It Looks Like An Awesome Box Of Money.

When You Take A Closer Look, It'll Seriously Blow Your Mind.


A skill like woodworking takes years and thousands of hours to become more than just a proficient at, but this man invested that time to be a certifiable master.  His name is Randall Rosenthal and he has talent that can result in mind-bending illusions.  The project in the gallery below all started with three pieces of white pine he glued together.  What he turned that block of wood into is so cool.

He glued the pieces of pine together as a base.


Once the adhesive cured, he was ready to begin carving the block.



He slowly whittled it down into an interesting shape.



The edges were jagged. What could it be?


Hmmmm..........


This is where the project began looking like the final project: a cardboard box.


By chipping away at the block of wood and hollowing out different sections, he was able to create the illusion that it was a box containing something.



He spent hours carefully carving the sides to give the illusion of corrugated cardboard.  The effect was incredible.


He took a break from the hours of carving to begin adding paint to the piece.  He carefully painted what was to be inside of the box: stacks of money.


Not only is Randall a gifted woodworker, but his painting skills are incredible as well.  After being painstakingly careful painting the bills and their details, he began slowly adding
color to the cardboard.




Since cardboard isn't something you can paint on in one sitting, he had to add light, washed out layers over and over.




Stunning.  He was able to carve something with so much depth and texture out of a simple block of wood.  No matter how long I stare at this, I can't be convinced that it's NOT a box of money.



A Japanese TV station interviewed Randall because of this incredible work.  Old Money was such a hit, he is being commissioned to make a second box.





Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Why Teachers Drink

The following questions were in last year's GED exam.

These are genuine answers (from 16 year olds)



Q. Name the four seasons
A. Salt, pepper, mustard and vinegar



Q. How is dew formed
A. The sun shines down on the leaves and makes them perspire



Q. What guarantees may a mortgage company insist on
A. If you are buying a house they will insist that you are
well endowed



Q. In a democratic society, how important are elections
A.. Very important. Sex can only happen when a male gets an
election



Q. What are steroids

A. Things for keeping carpets still on the stairs 

(Shoot yourself now , there is little hope)


Q... What happens to your body as you age
A. When you get old, so do your bowels and you get intercontinental


Q. What happens to a boy when he reaches puberty
A. He says goodbye to his boyhood and looks forward to his adultery
(So true)

Q. Name a major disease associated with cigarettes
A.. Premature death



Q. What is artificial insemination
A... When the farmer does it to the bull instead of the cow



Q. How can you delay milk turning sour
A.. Keep it in the cow
(Simple, but brilliant)


Q. How are the main 20 parts of the body categorized (e.g. The abdomen)
A.. The body is consisted into 3 parts - the brainium, the borax and the abdominal cavity.  The brainium contains the brain, the borax contains the heart and lungs and the abdominal cavity contains the five bowels: A,E,I,O,U  



Q. What is the fibula?
A. A small lie



Q. What does 'varicose' mean?
A. Nearby



Q. What is the most common form of birth control 
A. Most people prevent contraception by wearing a condominium
(That would work)


Q. Give the meaning of the term 'Cesarean section'
A. The cesarean section is a district in Rome



Q. What is a seizure?
A. A Roman Emperor.
(Julius Seizure, I came, I saw, I had a fit)


Q. What is a terminal illness
A. When you are sick at the airport.
(Irrefutable)


Q. What does the word 'benign' mean?
A.. Benign is what you will be after you be eight
(brilliant)





Saturday, April 26, 2014

Friday, April 25, 2014

The $383.00 Paint Job.


How cool is this?  See the sign?  "Please touch the car."

And it won’t scratch.

1949 Cadillac, completely covered with 38,295 pennies! 

They were affixed one by one using Silicone. They added over 200 pounds to the vehicle's weight, 

The entire project took 6 weeks. The pennies are American, and include an 1817 ''Big Cent'',  two Error Pennies,  and four 1943 Steel pennies.


























Thursday, April 24, 2014

Most Important Facts Dog Lovers Must Never Forget

Dogs are so loyal that they love us no matter what we do. But if we want to provide the best life possible to these wonderful animals, we have to remember they have complex thoughts and feelings, too. Here are 10 that we must never forget.


Don't be upset when I jump for joy when you come through the door.


I only live for ten or fifteen years. You are what makes that time enjoyable. It's hard on me when you go away.



Give me time to understand what you want from me.


I don't always get it right on the first try, but I promise I'm trying as hard as I can.


Give me your trust.


Just like I trust you, I need you to trust me, too.


Don't be angry with me for too long. And please don't lock me up to punish me.


You have your friends and family to keep you happy and entertained. I just have you.



Take me inside when the weather gets bad.



The backyard doesn't have air conditioning or a heater. You don't have to let me on the couch, but a small part of the kitchen is much better than sleeping in the snow.



Talk to me.


Sure, we don't speak the same language, but the sound of your voice brightens my whole day.



Comfort me when I'm scared.
                                                      

You know a lot more about loud noises, strange people, and new places than I do. I need to know that you'll protect me from them. I always feel safer when I'm with you.



Remember that I'll never forget how you treat me.


Teach me that humans are made of love, not pain. And don't ever let me forget it.



Come outside with me.


The sights, sounds, and scents of nature are some of my greatest pleasures in life. I don't care if we play, go for a walk, or just sit under a tree together . . . I want you to experience them with me.



Let me make new friends.


Introduce me to other dogs, cats, or even bigger animals. We might not get along in the end, but having some more friends that look and smell like me makes my life that much brighter.


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

A Country Founded by Geniuses but Run by Idiots

If you can get arrested for hunting or fishing without a license, but not for entering and remaining in the country illegally — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If you have to get your parents’ permission to go on a field trip or to take an aspirin in school, but not to get an abortion — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If you MUST show your picture identification to board an airplane, cash a check, buy liquor, or check out a library book and rent a video, but not to vote for who runs the government— you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If the government wants to prevent stable, law-abiding citizens from owning gun magazines that hold more than ten rounds, but gives twenty F-16 fighter jets to the crazy new leaders in Egypt — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If, in the nation’s largest city, you can buy two 16-ounce sodas, but not one 24-ounce soda, because 24-ounces of a sugary drink might make you fat— you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If an 80-year-old woman or a three-year-old girl who is confined to a wheelchair can be strip-searched by the TSA at the airport, but a woman in a burka or a hijab is only subject to having her neck and head searched — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If your government believes that the best way to eradicate trillions of dollars of debt is to spend trillions more — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If a seven-year-old boy can be thrown out of school for saying his teacher is “cute,” but hosting a sexual exploration or diversity class in grade school is perfectly acceptable — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If hard work and success are met with higher taxes and more government regulation and intrusion, while not working is rewarded with Food Stamps, WIC checks, Medicaid benefits, subsidized housing, and free cell phones — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If the government’s plan for getting people back to work is to provide incentives for not working, by granting 99 weeks of unemployment checks, without any requirement to prove that gainful employment was diligently sought, but couldn’t be found — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If you pay your mortgage faithfully, denying yourself the newest big-screen TV, while your neighbor buys iPhones, time shares, a wall-sized do-it-all plasma screen TV and new cars, and the government forgives his debt when he defaults on his mortgage — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.


If being stripped of your Constitutional right to defend yourself makes you more “safe” according to the government — you might live in a nation that was founded by geniuses but is run by idiots.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Earth Day 2014: How It Became a Global Environmental Event

More than a billion people around the world will celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2014—the 44th anniversary of the annual day of action.


Earth Day began in 1970, when 20 million people across the United States—that's one in ten—rallied for increased protection of the environment.


"It was really an eye-opening experience for me," Gina McCarthy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator, who was a self-described self-centered teenager during the first Earth Day rallies, told National Geographic. (See pictures: "The First Earth Day—Bell-Bottoms and Gas Masks.")


"Not only were people trying to influence decisions on the Vietnam War," she recalled, "but they were beginning to really focus attention on issues like air pollution, the contamination they were seeing in the land, and the need for federal action."


At the time, she said, the environment was in visible ruins—factories legally spewed black clouds of pollutants into the air and dumped toxic waste into streams. (Learn more about air pollution.)


"I can remember the picture of the Cuyahoga River being on fire," she said, referring to the Ohio waterway choked with debris, oil, sludge, industrial wastes, and sewage that spectacularly erupted in flames on June 22, 1969, and caught the nation's attention.


Although members of the public were increasingly incensed at the lack of legal and regulatory mechanisms to thwart environmental pollution, green issues were absent from the U.S. political agenda.


First Earth Day "Took Off Like Gangbusters"


The environment's low profile frustrated U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, whose campaigns to protect it during the 1960s had fallen flat.


In 1969 Nelson hit on the idea of an environmental protest modeled after anti-Vietnam War teach-ins.


"It took off like gangbusters. Telegrams, letters, and telephone inquiries poured in from all across the country," Nelson recounted in an essay shortly before he died in July 2005 at 89. "The American people finally had a forum to express its concern about what was happening to the land, rivers, lakes, and air—and they did so with spectacular exuberance." (Related: "Earth Day Pictures: 20 Stunning Shots of Earth From Space.")


Nelson recruited activist Denis Hayes to organize the April 22, 1970, teach-in, which today is sometimes credited with launching the modern environmental movement.


By the end of 1970, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had been established, and efforts to improve air and water quality were gaining political traction.


"It was truly amazing what happened," Kathleen Rogers, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Earth Day Network, told National Geographic News in 2009. "Blocks just tumbled."

John Roach
for National Geographic

PUBLISHED APRIL 21, 2014



Aflac employees picked through garbage bags in search of recyclable plastic,
aluminum, and cardboard for Earth Day last year.




Monday, April 21, 2014

WHY OLDER MEN DON'T GET HIRED




Job Interview: 


Human Resources Manager: 

"What is your greatest weakness?" 


Older Man : 

"My honesty." 


Human Resources Manager: 

"I don't think honesty is necessarily a weakness." 


Older Man : 

"I don't really give a shit what you think."