Friday, October 31, 2014

Halloween

The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[29] and is of Christian origin.[30] The word "Halloween" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[31] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[32][33] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en oreen. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) Eve(n) evolved into Halloween. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English (ealra hālgena mæssedæg, all saints mass-day), "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[33][34]  Wikipedia


Evolving from the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain, modern Halloween has become less about literal ghosts and ghouls and more about costumes and candy. The Celts used the day to mark the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter, and also believed that this transition between the seasons was a bridge to the world of the dead.  Over the millennia the holiday transitioned from a somber pagan ritual to a day of merriment, costumes, parades and sweet treats for children and adults.

Halloween, one of the world’s oldest holidays, is still celebrated today in a number of countries around the globe. In Mexico and other Latin American countries, Día de los Muertos—the Day of the Dead—honors deceased loved ones and ancestors. In countries such as Ireland, Canada and the United States, adults and children alike revel in the popular Halloween holiday, which derived from ancient festivals and religious rituals. Traditions include costume parties, trick-or-treating, pranks and games.


Thursday, October 30, 2014

Family Tree of Vincent Van Gogh

Have you met the family of Vincent Van Gogh?


His dizzy aunt -------------------- Verti Gogh

The brother who ate prunes--------------- Gotta Gogh

The brother who worked at a convenience store --- Stop N Gogh

The grandfather from Yugoslavia -------------- U Gogh

His magician uncle ------------ Where-diddy Gogh

His Mexican cousin ----------------- A Mee Gogh

The Mexican cousin's American half-brother -------- Gring Gogh

The nephew who drove a stage coach -------- Wells-far Gogh

The constipated uncle ----------- Can't Gogh

The ballroom dancing aunt --------------- Tang Gogh

The bird lover uncle -------------- Flamin Gogh

The fruit loving cousin ------------- Man Gogh

An aunt who taught positive thinking ----------- Way-to-Gogh

The little bouncy nephew ------------ Poe Gogh

A sister who loved disco ------ Go Gogh

And his niece who travels the country in an RV --- Winnie Bay Gogh


I saw you smiling ....... there ya Gogh!


Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Safety First

Just gotta love this!!

I was fed up with being burgled every other day in my neighborhood. So, I tore out my alarm system & de-registered from our local Neighborhood Watch.

 
I've planted a Pakistani flag in each corner of my front garden and a large Flag of ISIS in its center.

 
Now, the Yorkshire police, the National Security Bureau, Scotland Yard, MI-5, MI-6, the CIA and every other intelligence service in Europe are all watching my house 24 hours-7 days/week-365 days/year.


My children are followed to school every day, and my wife too, when she goes shopping. I'm followed to and from work every day. So no one bothers me at all. I've never felt safer.


Tuesday, October 28, 2014

the $5 bet...

 
Husband goes with his wife to her high school reunion.

 
After meeting several of her friends and former school mates, they are sitting at a table where he is yawning and overly bored. 

 
The band cranks up and people are beginning to dance. There's a guy on the dance floor living it large, break dancing, moon walking, back flips, buying drinks for people, the works. 

 
Wife turns to her husband and says, "See that guy? 25 years ago he proposed to me and I turned him down."

 
Husband says: "Looks like he's still celebrating!!!"


 
$5 says you will forward this ... :-)

Monday, October 27, 2014

ENGLISH Mensa Invitational - for lexophiles

 The Washington Post's Mensa Invitational once again invited readers to take any word from the  dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and supply a new definition.
   
   Here  are the  winners:

1.  Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house,  which renders the subject financially impotent for  an indefinite period of time. 

2. Ignoranus:  A person who's both stupid and an asshole.

3. Intaxicaton:  Euphoria at  getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize  it was your money to start with.

4. Reintarnation:  Coming back to  life as a hillbilly.

5. Bozone (n.):  The substance  surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately,  shows little sign of breaking down in the near future. 

6. Foreploy:  Any  misrepresentation about yourself for the purpose of getting laid  

7. Giraffiti: Vandalism spray-painted very, very high.

8. Sarchasm:  The gulf  between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

9. Inoculatte:  To take coffee intravenously when you are running  late.

10.  Osteopornosis: A degenerate disease.  (This one got extra credit)

11. Karmageddon:  It's like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes,  right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.

12. Decafalon  (n):The  grueling event of getting through the day consuming  only things that are good for you.

13. Glibido:  All talk and no action. 

14. Dopeler  Effect: The  tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly. 

15. Arachnoleptic  Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you've accidentally walked through a spider web.

16. Beelzebug  (n.): Satan in the form of a mosquito, that gets into your bedroom at three in the morning and cannot be cast  out.

17. Caterpallor (n.):  The color you turn after finding half a worm in the fruit you're eating. 



The WashingtonPost has also  published the winning submissions to its yearly  contest, in which readers are asked to supply  alternate meanings for common words.

And the  winners are:

1. Coffee, n.  The person upon whom one coughs. 

2. Flabbergasted,  adj. Appalled by discovering how much weight one has gained.  

3.  Abdicate, v. To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.

4. Esplanade, v.  To attempt an explanation while drunk.

5. Willy-nilly, adj.  Impotent.  

6.  Negligent, adj. Absent mindedly answering  the door when wearing only a  nightgown.

7. Lymph, v.  To walk with a  lisp.

8. Gargoyle, n.  Olive-flavored mouthwash.

9. Flatulence, n.  Emergency vehicle that picks up someone who has been run over  by a steamroller.

10. Balderdash,  n. A rapidly receding hairline.

11. Testicle, n.  A humorous question on an exam. 

12. Rectitude, n.  The formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists.  

13. Pokemon, n. A Rastafarian proctologist.  

14. Oyster, n. A person who sprinkles his  conversation with Yiddishisms.  

15. Frisbeetarianism, n. The belief that, after death, the soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there.

16. Circumvent, n. An opening in the front of  boxer shorts worn by Jewish  men.






Sunday, October 26, 2014

Prayer

Oswald Chambers wrote: “We tend to use prayer as a last resort, but God wants it to be our first line of defense. We pray when there’s nothing else we can do, but God wants us to pray before we do anything at all.”
At its root, prayer is simply a conversation with God, spoken in the expectation that God hears and answers. Prayer should not be a last resort. In His Word, God encourages us to engage Him in prayer (Phil. 4:6). We also have His promise that when “two or three are gathered together” in His name, He will be “there in the midst of them” (Matt. 18:20).

Insight
The book of James is often referred to as the Proverbs of the New Testament. This is an accurate description, for James is filled with practical advice for daily life as a Christian. In today’s passage, James points out that prayer is the appropriate response to any situation. If we suffer, we should pray. If we are happy, we should pray. If we are sick, prayer is the response. James uses a device called merism, which describes the whole by its parts. He highlights the extremes of life—suffering, happiness, sickness—to say that everything in between is included. Like Paul, James is telling us to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thess. 5:17).

Be anxious for nothing, but . . . let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God . . . will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. —Philippians 4:6-7




Friday, October 24, 2014

Funny Cat Names for Comical Felines


So you just got a new kitten -- congrats! Now it's time to pick a name. If your new cat is super silly and knows just how to make you laugh, a clever cat name might just be the trick. Here are 50 hilarious (and punny!) cat names that are simply purrfect for funny felines.




Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Interesting History NOT taught in school

Here is a little history. 
Including how the term ‘Leatherneck’ came to be. 

Most Americans are unaware of the fact that over two hundred years ago,the United States had declared war on Islam, and Thomas Jefferson led the charge! 

At the height of the eighteenth century, Muslim pirates were the terror of the Mediterranean and a large area of the North Atlantic. They attacked every ship in sight, and held the crews for exorbitant ransoms. 

Those taken hostage were subjected to barbaric treatment and wrote heart breaking letters home, begging their government and family members to pay whatever their Mohammedan captors demanded. 

These extortionists of the high seas represented the Islamic nations of Tripoli, Tunis, Morocco, and Algiers – collectively referred to as the Barbary Coast – and presented a dangerous and unprovoked threat to the new American Republic. 

Before the Revolutionary War, U.S. merchant ships had been under the protection of Great Britain. When the U.S. declared its independence and entered into war, the ships of the United States were protected by France. However, once the war was won, America had to protect its own fleets. Thus, the birth of the U.S. Navy. 

Beginning in 1784, seventeen years before he would become president, Thomas Jefferson became America’s Minister to France.

That same year, the U.S. Congress sought to appease its Muslim adversaries by following in the footsteps of European nations who paid bribes to the Barbary States, rather than engaging them in war. 

In July of 1785, Algerian pirates captured American ships, and the Day of Algiers demanded an unheard-of ransom of $60,000. It was a plain and simple case of extortion, and Thomas Jefferson was vehemently opposed to any further payments. Instead, he proposed to Congress the formation of a coalition of allied nations who together could force the Islamic states into peace. A disinterested Congress decided to pay the ransom. 

In 1786, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Great Britain to ask by what right his nation attacked American ships and enslaved American citizens, and why Muslims held so much hostility towards America, a nation with which they had no previous contacts. 

The two future presidents reported that Ambassador Sidi Haji Abdul Rahman Adja had answered that Islam "was founded on the Laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Quran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as Prisoners, and that every Musselman (Muslim) who should be slain in Battle was sure to go to Paradise." 

Despite this stunning admission of premeditated violence on non-Muslim nations,as well as the objections of many notable American leaders, including George Washington, who warned that caving in was both wrong and would only further embolden the enemy, for the following fifteen years, the American government paid the Muslims millions of dollars for the safe passage of American ships or the return of American hostages. 

The payments in ransom and tribute amounted to over twenty percent of the United States government annual revenues in 1800. 

Jefferson was disgusted. Shortly after his being sworn in as the third President of the United States in 1801, the Pashaof Tripoli sent him a note demanding the immediate payment of $225,000 plus $25,000 a year for every year forthcoming. 

That changed everything. 

Jefferson let the Pasha know, in no uncertain terms, what he could do with his demand. The Pasha responded by cutting down the flagpole at the American consulate and declared war on the United States.Tunis, Morocco, and Algiers immediately followed suit. 

Jefferson, until now, had been against America raising a naval force for anything beyond coastal defense, but having watched his nation be cowed by Islamic 
thuggery for long enough, decided that it was finally time to meet force with force. 

He dispatched a squadron of frigates to the Mediterranean and taught the Muslim of the Barbary Coast a lesson he hoped they would never forget. 

Congress authorized Jefferson to empower U.S. ships to seize all vessels and goods of the Pasha of Tripoli and to “cause to be done all other acts of precaution or hostility as the state of war would justify.” 

When Algiers and Tunis, who were both accustomed to American cowardice and acquiescence, saw the newly independent United States had both the will and the might to strike back, they quickly abandoned their allegiance to Tripoli. 

The war with Tripoli lasted for four more years, and raged up again in 1815. The bravery of the U.S. Marine Corps in these wars led to the line “to the shores of Tripoli” in the Marine Hymn.  They would forever be known as “leathernecks” for the leather collars of their uniforms, designed to prevent their heads from being cut off by the Muslim scimitars when boarding enemy ships. 

Islam, and what its Barbary followers justified doing in the name of their prophet and their god, disturbed Jefferson quite deeply. America had a tradition of religious tolerance, the fact that Jefferson, himself, had co-authored the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, but fundamentalist Islam was like no other religion the world had ever seen.

A religion based on supremacism, whose holy book not only condoned but mandated violence against unbelievers was unacceptable to him. His greatest fear was that someday this brand of Islam would return and pose an even greater threat to the United States. 

This should bother every American. That the Islams have brought about women-only classes and swimming times at taxpayer-funded universities and public pools; that Christians, Jews, and Hindus have been banned from serving on juries where Muslim defendants are being judged, Piggy banks and Porky Pig tissue dispensers have been banned from workplaces because they offend Islamist sensibilities. 

Ice cream has been discontinued at certain Burger King locations because the picture on the wrapper looks similar to the Arabic script for Allah, public schools are pulling pork from their menus, on and on in the news papers….

It’s death by a thousand cuts, or inch-by-inch as some refer to it, and most Americans have no idea that this battle is being waged every day across America. By not fighting back, by allowing groups to obfuscate what is really happening, and not insisting that the Islamists adapt to our own culture, the United States is cutting its own throat with politically correct knife, and helping to further the Islamists agenda.

Sadly, it appears that today’s America would rather be politically correct than victorious. 

Any doubts, just Google Thomas Jefferson vs the Muslim World or click this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Barbary_War 

Those who don't know HISTORY are destined to REPEAT it!


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Scientist Stumbles Upon Spider as Big as a Puppy

(NEWSER) – Strolling through a Guyana rainforest one night, a scientist heard some rustling and thought he'd encountered a furry mammal. Well, he was right about the furry part. The creature was actually a Goliath birdeater spider, LiveScience reports—the world's biggest type of spider, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. It can weigh up to 6 ounces. For comparison, National Geographic reports a black widow weighs roughly .035 ounces; that's 170 times lighter. Scientist Piotr Naskrecki writes its weight is "about as much as a young puppy," while its leg span can be a foot long, comparable with a kid's forearm, notes LiveScience. The body itself is fist-sized, Naskrecki says. The fangs? Two inches long. The thing won't kill you, but its bite feels "like driving a nail through your hand."

And when it rubs its legs on its body, it can fire out hairs carrying tiny barbs, which can really hurt and itch if they get you in the eyes. Ultimately, however, it seems the spider is just unpleasant, and not too common: "A chicken can probably do more damage," Naskrecki notes, adding that he's only seen one three times in as many as 15 years spent working in South America. Though MNN reports the spider was given the "birdeater" name after being discovered while eating a hummingbird, "they rarely have a chance to [kill birds] while scouring the forest floor at night," Naskrecki writes on his blog. "Rather, they seem to be feeding on what is available in this moist and warm habitat, and what is available is earthworms—lots of them."



Monday, October 20, 2014

Dying Man Reunited with Beloved Dog Makes Complete Turnaround

James Wathen, a terminally-ill patient at Baptist Health Corbin in Corbin, Kentucky, had stopped eating and had become weak and frail. His condition kept deteriorating, and he was barely able to talk. Wathen managed to whisper to a nurse his wish to see his dog, Bubba, just one more time. The 73-year-old hadn’t seen his one-eyed Chihuahua with no bottom teeth since he arrived by ambulance at the Whitley County hospital six weeks earlier.


“One of our social workers realized it was mourning the loss of the dog that was making our patient even worse and emotionally unhealthy, we pulled out all the stops and found the dog,” said Kimberly Probus, Chief Nursing Officer at Baptist Health Corbin


When time is of the essence, administrative policies can be cumbersome and time consuming, so it’s often easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission. So a group of nurses decided to track down Bubba and arrange a reunion with Wathen, even though the hospital had a rule against pets.


After a series of phone calls, the nurses found out that Bubba had been turned over to the Knox-Whitley Animal Shelter and then subsequently placed in a foster home because of his age. The nurses discovered that Bubba had also recently fallen ill. He too had stopped eating about a week before they made contact with the shelter to arrange the reunion.


“The dog quit eating a week ago, which is very strange. The dog didn’t know where James was and James didn’t know where the dog was and believe it or not, they both stopped eating at about the same time,” said Mary-Ann Smyth, Knox-Whitley Animal Shelter President


The nurses arranged for the shelter to bring Bubba to the hospital Saturday, October 11.



“He was so sad at first. We had him wrapped in a baby blanket and he was shivering. The minute we got about 20 steps from this guy’s room—I kid you not—his little head went up. His eyes got real bright and he was like a different dog,” Smyth said.


Bubba’s mood changed immediately upon seeing Wathen, and Wathen began crying when he saw Bubba.


“They didn't think James was going to make it. I was 10 feet from his bed and you could barely understand him because he was so hard to hear. The nurse had to lean up right against his face to hear what he was saying,” Smyth said.


During their 30-minute reunion, Wathen gradually began to improve. He slowly perked up and his mood changed significantly as he petted and played with Bubba on his bed.


“When Bubba was handed to James he started to cry and then Bubba started to snuggle James and it makes you realize that animals are not just pets they are loved ones,” wrote Deanna Myers, Knox Whitley Animal Shelter Director, on her Facebook page.


The impact of the reunion was readily apparent. “There wasn't a dry eye in the room,” Probus said.


“To see those two. To see James and Bubba get back together. It was heartwarming. It’s why we do what we do,” Smyth said.


The visit seemed to do wonders for Wathen. Nurses reported the next day that he seemed like a new person. When Bubba returned for a second visit on Tuesday, Wathen’s turnaround was complete. He was now sitting up and eating.


“Both are so happy to see each other and both seem to be doing better! The power of love can go along way!” the shelter posted on its Facebook page


Seeing the positive impact Bubba has had on Wathen, Baptist Health Corbin is revising its pet visitation policy to ensure Bubba will have visitation privileges.


“I hope this story will show to people the tremendous difference that animals can make in people’s lives,” Smyth said.


Hospital administrators are working to implement a pet visitation policy for similar situations now that they've witnessed first hand the healing power pets provide their owners.



Saturday, October 18, 2014

Answers for "next Batch"

Brigitte Bardot visits Pablo Picasso at his studio near Cannes in 1956



The original way to 'text' in Class (1944)



Audrey Hepburn at a premiere on September 14, 1953.



David Bowie's mugshot



Leather clad English rocker girl



High school fashion feature in Life Magazine (1969)



Ernest Hemingway's striking passport photo (1923)



Girl with typewriter and a smoke



A young Michael Caine in 1959



Sigourney Weaver in a suit



A couple dancing in a 1950's "Be Bop" theater as everyone looks on.


Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his cabinet - 1968. These men knew how to wear a suit.



A stylish couple in the rain in London (1963)



Ellen O'Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s.



A salesman has his motorized roller skates refueled at a gas station (1961)



A couple on Michigan Avenue in Chicago (1975)


A young Kevin Spacey (1980s)